The Five Umbrellas: Index

The Five Umbrellas: Index

 

Table of Contents

The Five Umbrellas: A Brief Introduction

The Five Essential Qualities of Effective Caregivers

Abbreviations

CD-ROM Alerts

The Five Umbrellas: A Quick Summary

The Five Umbrellas: Short descriptions

  • Umbrella #1: The 10-Ss
  • Umbrella #2: The “Five-Point-W”
  • Umbrella #3: Rules
  • Umbrella #4: Learning Styles
  • Umbrella #5: The Three Primary Underlying Theories

Chapter One – Umbrella #1: The 10-Ss

Chapter Two – Umbrella #2: The “Five-Point-W”

Chapter Three – Umbrella #3: Rules

Chapter Four – Umbrella #4: Learning Styles

Chapter Five – Umbrella #5: The Three Primary Underlying Theories

 

Additional Sections:

Chapter Six – The Sensory-Friendly Ecosystem

Chapter Seven – Planning, Designing and Conducting Therapeutic, Social Skills Groups for Persons with Asperger’s Syndrome

Chapter Eight – Acronyms and Mnemonics

 

Text References: Please see CD-ROM

 

The Three Universal Essentials: The Caregiver’s Default Setting

  • Strengths
  • Learning Style
  • Sensory Challenges

 

Chapter One: Umbrella #1: The 10 Ss

What are the 10-Ss?

The 10-S Wheel

The 10-Ss: An Introduction

S #1: Strengths

– Case Study: Stephen

Smile, prescription

S #2: Self-Esteem

Self-esteem, prescription to improve

S #3: Stress Management

Stress management, prescription to help minimize

S #4: Structure

Case study: “Tuesday morning…”

– Structure vs. Rigidity

– Routines and Rituals

Alternative wiring across the Three Spectrums

Structure, prescription

S #5: Sensory Challenges

The Spectrum of Sensory Modalities

The Three Primary Challenges brought about by Sensory Challenges:

  • Hypersensitivity
  • Hyposensitivity
  • Mixed hyper/hyposensitivity

The DSM IV-TR and ICD-10

Sensory overloads in daily life

Sensory Challenges, prescription

S #6: Special Topics

– List of unusual special topics reported

Special Topics, prescription

S #7: Support Systems

Support Systems, prescription

S #8: Self-Regulation

– Examples of socially acceptable self-regulation activities

– When self-regulation becomes a “problem”

The purpose of self-stimulatory behaviors

Self-Regulation, prescription

S #9: Social Skills

Common social areas of difficulty for persons throughout the three spectrums

Social “Differences”

An analogy to cross-cultural communications

A few words about current Diagnostic Systems: DSM-IV-TR and ICD-10

– Nonverbal Behaviors

– Communication

– Social Deficits

High Functioning Autism

Nonverbal Learning Disability: The (NLD) Challenge

  • Nonverbal Learning Disorder: A quick description

NLD = V-S, POD w/APA

NLD references

Social Skills, prescription

S #10: Sleep

The Five Sleep Stages

Advantages of a “good night’s sleep”

Sleep Problems shared by children throughout the three spectrums

Healthy Sleep Suggestions

Sleepy-time No-Nos!

Using the “Five-Point-W” to help with Sleepy Time

Using Acronyms, Initialisms and Pseudo-blends

Acronym for “Bedtime Rules”

Acronym Creating Internet Sites

Acronym for “Waking Time”

Sleep, prescription

 

Chapter Two: Umbrella #2: The “Five-Point W” Method

The “Five-Point-W” matrix

The “Five-Point W” Method: Practical Wisdom

The “Five-Point W” Method Prompt Card

The “Five-Point W” Method, explaining to parents and caregivers

The “Five-Point-W”, translating the main points of going on a field trip into “Five-Point-W” format

Five-Point-W” flow chart

Why “why?” doesn’t work

Incorporating Visual-Tactile/Kinesthetic, Auditory/Verbal prompts to help maximize the effectiveness of interventions

Five-Point-W” generic flow chart

Self-Regulation: Sample topic

  • Challenge: Becoming better aware of our emotions
  • Strategy: The “Five-Point W”

Anxiety or Panic: Sample topic

  • Challenge: Addressing feelings of anxiety or rising panic
  • Strategy: The “Five-Point-W” combined with Special Topics

Processing anxiety via the “Five-Point-W” method flow chart

Why does my daughter need an assessment?” – Sample topic

  • Challenge: Rephrasing concerns regarding the need for an evaluation
  • Strategy: The “Five-Point-W”

Advantages of a “Five-Point-W” approach

Personal journeys and anecdotal evidence

Five-Point-W” Circular matrix – Generic example

Five-Point-W” Star matrix – Generic example

The “Five-Point-W” Method – A Primer: Turning “Why’s” to Whats-Whichs-Whos-Wheres-Whens-&-Hows

Taking medication: Sample topic

Starting an exercise program: Sample topic

Getting forms signed: Sample topic

Sitting up straight and focusing: Sample topic

Cleaning up one’s room: Sample topic

Disruptive Behaviors: Sample topic

Designing intervention plans via the “Five-Point-W” Method: Sample topic

Finding the “True Underlying Reason” via the “Five-Point-W” Method: Sample topic

The “Five-Point-W” Visual Sequence Chart

The “Five-Point-W” Visual Sequence Processing chart

 

Practical examples illustrating the combined application of the “Five-Point-W” Method, and 10-Ss

Addressing tantrums and meltdowns: Sample topic

The 10-Ss (listed)

Common “losing it” expressions

Tantrum Triggers

  • Structure Collapse
  • Sensory over/under-load

Case study: “Losing it”

Structure collapse, examples

Sensory over/under-load, examples

Understanding tantrums and meltdowns

Prevention-Prevention-Prevention

Using the “Five-Point-W” Method to deduce what may be the cause of the tantrum

Self-Regulation

Raising emotion awareness: Sample topic

Five-Point-W” flow chart for processing sensations

Disruptive behaviors, two primary triggers that lead to

Minimizing Disruptive Behaviors during Assessment or Initial Therapy Sessions

Time-Offs: Defined

Support system comfort wheel

Bullying: Sample topic

Case Study: “Linda”

Life-Line school support network

Disclosure: The “Five-Point-W” Way

Using the “Five-Point-W” Method to facilitate disclosure in the workplace or at an academic setting

Five-Point-W” disclosure matrix

Token Economies and Behavioral Charts

Tokens, list of popular and commonly used

Token Systems, applying learning/orientation styles to

Token Economies, setting up as contingency management systems

Token economy systems, advantages

Behavioral Charts

Reducing “why-ning” – Sample topic

Using the child’s Strengths, Learning style, Structure, and Rules to establish tokens

Evening behavioral chart with token system

The “Token Economy” is not what it used to be

List of quirky Aspie comebacks

Problems with Flexibility

Beyond Rules

Focusing on the Person’s Learning/Thinking/Orientation Style

  • Visual Thinkers
  • Auditory Thinkers
  • Tactile/Kinesthetic Thinkers

Using the “Five-Point-W” Method with a tactile-oriented child: Sample topic

Strategy: “Why?” vs. “Five-Point-W” approaches

What/who/which/where/when/how” (”Five-Point-W”) Method

Examples of Token graphics included in this book and companion CD-ROM

  • Generic Token Card
  • Sample token card for a young girl saving points for a new bicycle
  • Sample token card for a child who earns 15 minutes of free time for every 15 minutes of work performed
  • Alternate sample card for same topic as above
  • Sample token card for a child who works on an assignment during three different time periods before being able to receive the token
  • Sample token card for earning either music listening time or money to purchase a music player, musical CD, or music downloads
  • Generic token card to be turned in after four completed tasks
  • Sample “Social Feat” token card

Generic token card sample

Helping at home after school token card, sample

Sample token card for a child who earns a token for every 15 minutes of work performed

Sample token card for a child who earns a break after each 15 minute segment of work

performed, then receives 15 minutes of free time

Sample token card for a child who works on an assignment during three different time periods before being able to receive the token

Sample token card for someone who is saving points toward earning either music listening time or money to purchase a music player, musical CD, or music downloads

Generic token card to be turned in after four completed tasks, sample

Token card to be turned in after four completed assigned tasks, sample

Social Feat” token card to be turned in after four successful “social feats” accomplished throughout the day, sample

Generic “Five-Point-W” Work Sheet, sample

 

Chapter Three: Umbrella #3: Rules

Identifying Learning Styles

Labels: To give or not to give? That is the question.

Benefits of clinical labels

Diagnostic labels, two practical purposes of

Learning and orienting styles: Personalizing interventions to each individual

  • Visual learners and thinkers: Learning by watching
  • Auditory learners and thinkers: Learning by listening
  • Tactile/Kinesthetic learners and thinkers: Learning by doing
  • Other learning and orienting styles
  • Multi-System Learners

Learning and orienting styles typically associated with persons with AS, HFA and NLD

Learning Styles Internet Websites

What is your Learning Style? A Short Quiz

– Learning Styles Quiz Answer Key

– Learning Styles answer form

Sample topics:

  • organization
  • time management
  • scheduling
  • flexibility
  • fears and worries

Crossing street reminder flow chart

School day schedule reminder flow chart

Schedule reminder form, strategy

School day reminder pull-down menu

Reminder pull-down menu, strategy

Flexibility Prompt for a rainy day

Discarding unwanted thoughts: Sample topic

Flexibility Prompts, strategy

Virtual Funnel Flush

Virtual Funnel Flush, strategy

Breathe in…Breathe out…” Circular Visual Reminder

Circular Visual Reminder, strategy

Solution Rising Cone

Solution Rising Cone, strategy

 

Chapter Four: Umbrella #4: Learning Styles

Advantages of using rules

Setting Rules: The 10 Steps

The Three-to-One Rule: Description and Illustration

Creating Personalized Rules Books

Rules for visual and tactile persons

Rules for auditory persons

Power Phrases, strategy

Special Topic related Power Phrase examples:

  • Centaurs
  • Vacuum cleaners
  • Weather systems
  • Robots
  • Dinosaurs
  • Cheerleaders
  • Guitars
  • Elevators

Special Topic Words and Phrases

Special Topic Power Sequence

Successful toileting experience: Sample topic

Creating a “Special Topic power word sequence”

– Sample steps to follow

Names of magical characters

Acronyms and Mnemonics, strategy

Steps for a successful toileting experience

Successful toileting experience Acronym

Using Acronyms and Mnemonics

Circular Mnemonics, strategy

Circular Mnemonic – Example

Rules, strategy

Using Rules

Rule examples

Adapting rules to every situation

Rule Stripping

The “3-1 Rule” – Introduction

The Three-to-One Rule: Designing Rules for Therapy Situations

Establishing an early, positive working alliance through rules

The Genesis of the “3-1 Rule”

Explaining the Three-to-One Rule to others

Three-to-One Rule timetable example

Modifying the Three-to-One Rule: Adapting rules according to each person,

setting, and situation

Three-to-One rule “strengths to weaknesses” matrix

Additional Three-to-One Rule suggestions

Goal setting via the Three-to-One Rule

Case study: Josh

Tony’s “The Three-to-One Rule Story”

The 2/3rd’s Rule – Introduction

Is it always “2/3rd’s”?

The 2/3rd’s Rule Math Index: A user friendly formula for the mathematically

challenged

Girls, Adults and the 2/3rd’s Rule

 

Chapter Five: Umbrella #5: The Three Primary Underlying Theories

  • Theory of Mind
  • Central Coherence
  • Executive Dysfunction

Theory of Mind: Three Levels

ToM Three Levels – general pyramid example

ToM Three Levels – personalized pyramid example

The Genesis of Theory of Mind

Ten body language components

Recognizing Theory of Mind

Problems with Theory of Mind manifested

Suggestions for teaching Theory of Mind

Theory of Mind, example

Theory of Mind, example 2

Theory of Mind across the autistic spectrum

Theory of Mind and Asperger’s

Theory of Mind and NLD

Theory of Mind, a closing word

Theory of Mind strategy: “I’m Thinking…But I should Say Bubbles”

Teaching the difference between thoughts and feelings

I’m thinking…but I should say…” Thinking Bubbles social example

I’m thinking…but I should say…” Thinking Bubbles work related example

Thinking Bubble “Teeter-Totter” variation examples

Teaching the difference between thoughts and feelings

Thinking vs. Feeling words: Examples

Facial Expression Internet Websites

Pre-school Neurotypical Social Characteristics, flow chart

Primary school Neurotypical Social Characteristics, flow chart

Pre-Adolescence Neurotypical Social Characteristics, flow chart

Adolescence Neurotypical Social Characteristics, flow chart

Theory of Mind strategy: Social Boundary Circles

Relationship Boundary Circles: Version one

Relationship Boundary Circles: Version two

Relationship Boundary Circles: Version three

Relationship Boundary Circles: Version four

Relationship Boundary Circles with text cards: Generic form

Steps for completing Relationship Boundary Circles

Circle one with text cards sample: Adult

Circle two with text cards sample: Adult

Circle three with text cards sample: Adult

Outside the circle: Adult

Applying the Relationship Boundary Circle strategy to a child’s or teen’s situation

Circle one with text cards sample: Child or teen

Circle two with text cards sample: Child or teen

Circle three with text cards sample: Child or teen

Outside the circle: Child or teen

Venn Diagrams, strategy

Using Venn Figures to Clarify Relationship Boundaries

Steps for completing Venn Figure Boundary Circles

Venn Figure Example 1: Family vs. Neighbors vs. Strangers

Venn Figure Example 2: My things vs. her things vs. his things

Fluid Diagrams, strategy

Fluid Venn Figure Example 3: My things vs. her things vs. his things

Venn Figure Example 4: My Pokèmon vs. her Pokèmon vs. his Pokèmon

Fluid Venn Figure Example 5: My Pokèmon vs. her Pokèmon vs. his Pokèmon

Life-Line Diagrams, strategy

Life-Line Support Diagram

Life-Line Support Networks, strategy

Personal life-line support network: Large card

Social Support Network Diagram

Flow charts, strategy

Self-Regulating Time-Off Rules Flow Chart

Flexible Options Flow Chart

Social Etiquette flow chart

Dinner party flow chart

Body proximity diagrams, strategy

Social Distance Figure

 

Central Coherence: The Weak Central Coherence Theory

Detail vs. the Big Picture

Central Coherence explained

Weak Central Coherence: An example

Central Coherence at Work: Central wiring with the social in mind

The Amazing Human Mind: An example of central coherence

Central Coherence and AS

Central Coherence, examples

Keeping the big picture in mind: Sample topic

Focusing on the big picture, “think before talking”

Central Theme Reminder Generic Diagram

Fitting in during the neighborhood bask: Sample topic

Central Theme Reminder Diagram Example for “Fitting in”

Focusing on the bottom line, “impressing the boss” – Sample topic

Central Theme Reminder Diagram Example for “Impressing the boss” (arrow version)

Remembering the theme of the day, “Celebrating the birthday boy” – Sample topic

Central Theme Reminder Diagram Example for “Celebrating the birthday boy” (arrow version)

Keeping my support system in mind: Sample topic

Central Coherence Personal Network Support System diagram

Something special each person offers me: Sample topic

Alternate Central Coherence Personal Network Support System diagram

Safe” comments to make when feeling unsure: Sample topic

Counter comments “Cheat Sheet”

Weak Central Coherence: A “deficit” or an “advantage”?

Central Coherence Exercise: Handling anxiety during initial social encounters

  • reframing via the “Five-Point-W”
  • main things to keep in mind when first meeting someone
  • appropriate social situation responses

Central Coherence Exercise: Dealing with socially disruptive ritualistic behaviors

  • processing via the “Five-Point-W”

Central Coherence Exercise: Addressing Ritualistic Behaviors

Acronym to address ritual behaviors

  • Variant strategy: Using a Circular Visual Prompt combined with an acronym

Circular Visual Prompt + acronym mnemonic

  • Variant strategy 2: Identifying and processing rituals via the “Five-Point-W”
  • Variant strategy 3: Using a Sequence Arrow format to structure, sequence, organize and prioritize an order of events

Sequence Arrow Flow Charts, strategy

Sequence Arrow Diagram

Main Point, Special-Topic Reminder Cards, strategy

Main Point, Special-Topic Reminder Card example: Focusing

Main Point, Special Topic Circular Figure example: Laser focusing

Ratio diagrams, strategy

Generic 3:1 “Listening to talking” Ratio Diagram

3:1 Ratio Diagram for “not discussing people’s weight”

Socially appropriate vs. inappropriate topics

Not discussing people’s weights

Four Universal “No-Nos” reminder card

Generalizing vs. Perseveration

 

Executive Dysfunction

The Brain’s Executive

Three main executive functions

Broader areas associated with executive dysfunction

Organization

Change and Transition

Flexibility and Spontaneity

Addressing Executive Function challenges in a group setting

Challenges typically associated with Executive Dys-functions

Using Acronyms to assist with executive function challenges

Impulse Inhibition, “talking without thinking” – Sample topic

Response inhibition: The TACT rule

TACT acronym for response inhibition

TACT rule flow chart

TACT rule flow chart – alternates

Working memory: Sample topic

Five-Point-W” flow chart to assist with working memory

Time management and organization: Sample topic

Sample calendar for a full school week

Sample calendar for a full month

Weekly calendars to assist with Time Management and Organization

Reversed Pyramid Prompts

Multitasking: Sample topic

Reversed pyramid prompt to assist with multitasking and keeping track of scheduled projects

Other visual prompts and reminders

Time management, organization and sequencing: Sample topic

Time Management Sequence Strategy Flow Charts

Time management: Sample topic

Time Management Sequence Strategy flow chart

Auditory Prompts

Structuring a physical exercise routine: Sample topic

Time Management music selections choice card for an exercise routine

Focusing on the moment: Sample topic

Five-Point-W” flow chart to assist one with focusing on the moment

Social Interaction Strategies incorporating Theory of Mind, Central Coherence

and Executive Functions

Conversation Chain Figures, strategy

Rehearsal, strategy

Default Response Pull Downs, strategy

Default Response Pull Down for social come-backs – Example 1

Default Response Pull Down for social come-backs – Example 2

Conversation Chain of Default Responses

Informal social chatting: Sample topic

Conversation Chain of Default Responses – Example 1

Conversation Chain of Default Responses – Example 2

Social Default Response Examples

Social Default Response Examples: Expressions that serve as typical Social Default Responses

Task Chain Flow Charts, strategy

Bathroom routine: Sample topic

Task Chain flow chart for bathroom routine

Brushing one’s teeth: Sample topic

Task Chain flow chart for brushing one’s teeth

Social Safari forms

Figuring out social expressions: Sample topic

Social Safari form for noting “expressions and their meanings”

Default Social Expression Pull-Down Charts, strategy

Default Social Expression pull-down chart examples

Conversation Pyramids, strategy

Impulse control and “Fitting in!” – Sample topic

Conversation pyramid example: “fitting in!”

Anxiety, handling: Sample topic

Anxiety and Executive Dysfunction: Life-Line Directories

Change, dealing with: Sample topic

Life-Line Directory, example: “dealing with change”

Verbal reminders: Sample topic

Verbal Reminders flow chart

After-school tasks to remember: Sample topic

Handy-Dandy after school reminder card

Impulse control and using appropriate social communication: Sample topic

Social graces, example: Win, lose or draw flow chart

Time Management Challenges: Alternative responses to just “saying no!”

Default Pull-Down Options card for “saying no” in socially appropriate ways

Flexibility: Sample topic

Floating Time Variables and Structured Flexibility

After school responsibilities flow chart with Floating Time Variables (FTVs)

Flexible Time Management Challenges: Sample topic

Time Management matrix for a 30-Minute Quiz

Prioritizing: Sample topic

Hierarchical Pyramid Chart, example: prioritizing responsibilities

Impulse control: Fears, worries and other intrusive thoughts: Sample topic

Virtual Flush Funnel figure for impulse control

Agitation vs. Relaxation: Switching gears: Sample topic

Special Topics – using as a visual analogy, example: mechanical gears

Pacing yourself during a test: Using a television program as an analogy: Sample topic

Special Topic as a visual analogy, example: television

Impulse control: Sample topic

Things to say…things not to say impulse control cards, strategy

Things to say…things not to say card example

 

 

Chapter Six: The Sensory Friendly Ecosystem

Designing Sensory-Friendly Environments

Sensory-Friendly Ecosystem #1: The “Busy Room”

Entrainment

Sensory-Friendly Ecosystem #2: The White Room

Cardinal Rules of every Sensory-Friendly Ecosystem

Read my lips: NO…FLUORESCENT…LIGHTS!

Manufacturers and Retailers of Natural and Full Spectrum lighting

Minimizing strong, or noticeable scents.

Mold and mildew dehumidifiers

Sound Rules: Blocking out intrusive sounds

Sound Resources

Sensory-sensitive furniture options

Sensory-friendly “manipulatives” (toys and knick knacks)

Snoezelen Rooms

Sensory friendly product references

 

Chapter Seven: Group Intervention Strategies: Planning, Designing and Conducting Therapeutic Social Skills Groups for Persons with Asperger’s Syndrome

Social-Skills Group Outlines

Format one: Running six-week, six “S” groups

Format two: Running 12-week, 10 “S” groups

Flexibility of group outlines: Adapting each outline according to group dynamics

General suggestions for peer-related, social-skills groups for children and teens across the three spectrums:

  • Suggested number of group members
  • Ages and sex of group members
  • Provide each group member with a personal notebook, daily planner and calendar
  • Groups should be carefully structured
  • Groups should be time-limited and the time limits should be clearly specified
  • Groups should follow a sequence of minor themes that come together under the umbrella of a larger theme
  • Homework” vs. “Secret Safaris”
  • Adapting the “Three-to-One Rule” to the group setting
  • Flexible Structure
  • Processing time
  • The Social Experience
  • Weekly Secret Safari Guidelines

 

Designing and Running a Six Week “Aspie” Group: A Six-week, time limited, theme-oriented group model

Five S” Six-week Group Outline: Sample Format

Weekly Themes for the “Five S” Six Week Group Format:

Week one: Strengths

Three-to-one “Weight Scale” cards

Strengths, 3:1 example of a Weight scale prompt during Week One

Three-to-one Pie Charts

Strength Pie chart for a child who perseverates on train talk, 3:1 example

Strength Pie chart for a child dealing with verbal abuse, 3:1 example

Week two: Self-Esteem

Weight scale prompt for Week Two: Self-Esteem, 3:1 example

Self Esteem Pie chart: Blank form, 3:1 example

Self Esteem Pie chart: Three things that boost my self esteem vs. one thing that makes me feel bad, 3:1 example

Week three: Stress Management

Stress Management, 3:1 example of a Weight scale prompt during Week Three

Things that help me to relax”, 3:1 example for a Pie Chart

Dealing with Stress during a school bus ride, 3:1 example for a Pie Chart (2)

Week four: Structure

Structure, 3:1 example of a Weight scale prompt during Week Four

Structure: 3:1 example for dealing with a class not starting at the scheduled time Pie Chart

Week five: Sensory Challenges

Sensory Challenges, Basic 3:1 Success Pyramid example prompt for noting sensory challenges

Sensory Challenges, 3:1 example of a Weight scale prompt for Week Five

Sensory Challenges, 3: 1 example of a Pie chart for Dealing with fluorescent lights

Week six: Summary

Summary week, 3:1 example of a Weight scale prompt for Week Six

Summary week, 3:1 example of a Pie Chart for Week Six

Synonyms and Antonyms list

  • Strengths vs. weaknesses
  • (high) self esteem vs. (low) self esteem
  • Structure vs. Lack of Structure
  • Stress Management vs. Stressed Out
  • Sensory
  • Sensory Metaphors
  • Temperature
  • Texture
  • Light
  • Smell (scents)
  • Sounds

Weekly Secret Safaris for the “Five S,” Six-Week Group Format

 

Weekly (Topic)-Seeking-Safari Instructions

Designing and Running a Twelve Week “Aspie” Group

A Twelve-week Time limited, Theme-oriented group model,

10-S” Twelve-week Group Outline

Conducting 24, 36, 48, or longer week group formats

The Big Three: Flexibility, Creativity and Consistency

The 10-S, 12-Week, Group Outline Themes

10-S, 12-week Group Themes

Week One: Starting Off

Weight scale prompt for starting off week

Pie chart for starting off week

Week Two: Strengths

Week Three: Self-Esteem

Week Four: Stress Management

Week Five: Support Systems

Support Systems, 3: 1 example for a Weight scale prompt for Week Five

Support Systems, 3: 1 example of Pie chart for Week Five

Fixing meals vs. loading computer software: Sample topic

Week Six: Self-Regulation

Self Regulation, 3: 1 example for a Weight scale prompt for Week Six

Self Regulation, 3: 1 example for a Pie Chart for Week Six

Musical abilities and auditory hypersensitivity: Sample topic

 

Week Seven: Special Topics

Special Topics, 3: 1 example for a Weight scale prompt for Week Seven

Special Topics, 3: 1 example for a Pie chart for Week Seven

Affinity for science vs. dislike for politics: Sample topic

 

Week Eight: Social Skills

Social Skills, 3: 1 example for a Weight scale prompt for Week Eight

Social Skills, 3: 1 example of a Pie chart for Week Eight

Preferred vs. non-preferred social topics: Sample topic

Week Nine: Structure

Structure, 3: 1 example for a Weight scale prompt for Week Nine

Structure, 3: 1 example of a Pie chart for Week Nine

Positive vs. negative travel and direction interests: Sample topic

Week Ten: Sensory Challenges

Sample 3:1 Weight scale prompt for Week Ten: Sensory Challenges, 3: 1 example for

Sample 3:1 Pie chart for Sensory Challenges, 3: 1 example for

Objects that soothe vs. objects that irritate: Sample topic

Week Eleven: Sleep

Sleep, 3: 1 example for a Weight scale prompt for Week Eleven

Sleep, 3: 1 example of a Pie chart for Week Eleven

Sleeping aids vs. sleeping irritants: Sample topic

Week Twelve: Summary

Summary Week, 3: 1 example for a Weight scale prompt for Week Eleven

Summary Week, 3: 1 example of a Pie chart for Week Eleven

Attributes liked vs. those disliked in group setting: Sample topic

Suggested week-by-week group gifts

12 week, 10-S group matrix examples

Week One: Strength Matrix

Week Two: Self-Esteem Matrix

Week Two: Self-Esteem Alternate Matrix

Week Two: Self-Esteem Alternate (2) Matrix

Week Three: Stress Management Matrix

Week Four: Structure Matrix

Week Four: Structure Matrix Alternate

Week Five: Sensory Challenges Matrix

Week Five: Sensory Challenges Matrix – Sample for Food (gustatory)

Week Five: Sensory Challenges Matrix – Sample for visual

Week Five: Sensory Challenges Matrix – Sample for tactile/kinesthetic

Week Five: Sensory Challenges Matrix – Sample for scents (olfactory)

Week Five: Sensory Challenges Matrix – Sample for sounds (auditory)

Week Six: Support System Matrix

Week Six: Support System Matrix Alternate

Week Six: Self-Regulation Matrix

Week Six: Self-Regulation Matrix Alternate

Week Six: Self-Regulation Matrix Alternate (2)

Week Seven: Special Topics Matrix

Week Seven: Social Skills Matrix

Week Seven: Social Skills Matrix Alternate

Week Eleven: Sleep Week Matrix

Week Eleven: Sleep Week Matrix Alternate

Week Eleven: Sleep (+ sensory) Week Matrix Alternate (2)

Week Eleven: Sleep (+ sensory) Week Matrix Alternate (2)

Week Twelve: Summary Week Matrix

Week Twelve: Summary Week Matrix Alternate

Empowerment Phrases

Three Types of Empowerment Phrases

  • Verbal Wisdom Words and Power Phrases – for auditory learners
  • Toughen Thoughts and Ideal Images – for visual thinkers
  • Dandy Deeds and Alert Actions – for “hands-on,” kinesthetic or tactile types

3:1 Rule Empowerment Phrases – Verbal Wisdom Words or Power Phrases

3:1 Rule Empowerment Phrases – Toughen Thoughts and Ideal Images

3:1 Rule Empowerment Phrases – Dandy Deeds and Alert Actions

 

Chapter Eight: ACRONYMS and Mnemonics

 

Acronym and Mnemonic Examples

SMART acronym/mnemonic

SMART Acronym, example of matrix wheel

WISE acronym/mnemonic

WISE Acronym, example of matrix circle

IMPATIENCE acronym/mnemonic

Format A: Tube System

Tube System for IMPATIENCE Acronym/mnemonic

Format B: Circular Arrow System

Circular Arrow system for IMPATIENCE Acronym/mnemonic

LISTEN acronym/mnemonic

LISTEN acronym, example matrix wheel

Additional Sample Acronyms and Mnemonics:

  • WATER
  • SMART
  • SHARP
  • STOP!
  • WIND
  • PEACE
  • SMILE
  • WISDOM
  • IMPULSE
  • BREATHE

The “Acronym + one rule”

  • SMILE + one

SMILE + one acronym

  • FIRE + one
  • FLOW + one
  • SPEAK + one

 

Appendix